Video: Marxism, Socialism, and Bernie Sanders (Brandon Turner Pt. 2)

Brandon Turner (Political Theory Professor) joins Dave Rubin to discuss Alexis De Tocqueville, Karl Marx, Bernie Sanders, Socialism and more.

This is part of our collaboration with Learn Liberty featuring interviews with classical liberals. Check out Learn Liberty on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/LearnLiberty

The Rubin Report is fan funded: http://www.rubinreport.com/donate

The portion of the interview starting at approximately 9 min is of particular interest dealing with the mythology of socialist nations not being socialist:

From the YouTube transcription:

Brandon Turner: if you look at Venezuela you look at Chavez you look at things like that I mean that’s what socialism looks like.

Dave Rubin: I always see people saying that you can’t look at Venezuela because it doesn’t give you the right example of socialism. The socialists will say that it didn’t work out the way they wanted it to.

Brandon Turner: Yeah I don’t know I mean the 20th century is a pretty long advert.
[..]

Brandon Turner: I think a lot of libertarian 20 century libertarian thought offers good arguments as to why socialism will always look like that so in other words this wasn’t an accident. This is how it’s always going to play out and here are reasons for that so if you look at Mises, if you look at Hayek they make that case and those are really good resources.

 

Fascist Left Follies 2017-05-04

“A lie told often enough becomes the truth.” Vladimir Lenin

” If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” Adolf Hitler

Two items from the news to be considered:

From Right Wing News: Communist Speaker To Coach Berkley How To Drive Trump Supporters From Campus

A flier being distributed to promote the event attempts to make her communism more attractive by invoking the name of Bob Avakian, UC Berkeley grad and chairman of the Revolutionary Communist Party.

Following in the footsteps of Vladimir Lenin and Adolf Hitler, these folks have the mistaken belief repeating a lie will make it the truth. But repetition alone cannot disguise the fact that it is they who acting in the role that they project on others.

They also are using the same tactics as the Socialist regime of Nicholas Maduro to impose their vile ideology by force.

From the PanAm Post: Why Venezuela’s Dictatorship Is About To End

Violence, on the other hand, is the strategy of those who are starting to lose power. It’s a tool used by the dictatorship to maintain what it has already lost. But that’s just the point: they already lost it.

Today we are seeing a dictatorship in its worst form: unprecedented violence from a fascist and criminal regime that has tried to repress its people.

We must understand that those who give the orders today have nothing to lose. It’s completely natural for them to react brutally, because they feel increasingly threatened. The fact that repression is worsening only shows that we are moving in the right direction.

The more violent, criminal and fascist the dictatorship becomes, the closer we are to victory. The beast-like display of repression and crimes are evidence of the final stage of a dying project.

The toys of Socialist Oppression

Anyone viewing the horror of the typical oppression borne of a Socialist regime may have noticed some of the kit utilised by the Maduro regime. The Caracas chronicles gives us a run down on the major pieces:

Military-style gear is one thing the regime’s never scrimped on. The trend started by Hugo Chávez in 2005 renewed Venezuela’s military gear, supposedly to prepare for battle against the countless imaginary enemies chavismo created through the years. But really, we always knew who the real target was, because it stared back at us from the mirror each morning.

Even as the economic crisis hit hard, forcing the Maduro government to reduce its military expenses —by more than 90% compared to the Chávez years, according to some NGOs, — they continued the “Eternal Commander’s” tradition. That’s why, in a country where food and medicines are nowhere to be seen, there’s a squad of armored personnel carriers (APCs), fully equipped with tear gas canisters and rubber pellets, waiting for every march and protest to reach them.

Armored Vehicles: APC’s (a.k.a., “Tanquetas”)

Its official designation is the VN-4 armored vehicle, manufactured in China by the Chinese Defense Company, NORINCO. Unlike most people tend to think, they are quite modern and versatile, able to carry two drivers and up to eight soldiers inside, reaching up to 115 km/h and being able to go for about 700 km. without refueling.

VN-4s can do a lot of damage. The original, warfare-oriented units have a central turret that is usually armed with a 7,5 mm. heavy machine gun. The units deployed in Venezuelan protests, however, have been modified for riot-control purposes with the machine gun being replaced for a more “friendly” tear-gas launcher. The little white beasts can also be equipped with several Bond-like gadgets, including an infrared night-vision system and a central tire inflation system that prevents them from being disabled by a flat tire. These perks, however, are optional, and we doubt if Baduel sprung extra for those.

Murciélagos

The ABV-1, better known as el murciélago (“the bat”) is a really peculiar vehicle. It was named after bats because of their two “wings” —a pair of about 3-meter tall barriers that can be deployed laterally from both sides of the truck, creating a cover for officers behind them and solidly blocking people from going beyond a certain point.

In Caracas, they have been used to literally divide the city in half.

Remember Freddy Guevara’s already famous video in which he lent his parliamentary immunity to an almost-captured protester by hugging him while some GNBs tried to separate them? It all happened right in front of a couple of these things.

Ballenas

Water cannon trucks, or “whales,” are one of the most storied machines of riot control. Unlike the “bat,” they’ve been around since the 1930s, widely used around the world. They became infamous during the American Civil Rights Movement in the 60s. They are no less new in Venezuela; police forces have been using them for quite a long time, even before chavismo’s rise to power. Their usage, however, has been dramatically reduced lately in most parts of the world, mainly because under certain circumstances, they may cause death or severe trauma.

Venezuela bought 10 of these things a few years ago from —who else?— China. The model is NORINCO’s WTC-1 and most units are also currently deployed in Caracas. Now, 10 water cannon trucks might not seem like much of a threat, but countries like the UK have only six of them and strict limitations restrict their use. As with most of the Government’s deals, the price of these trucks is unknown, but similar versions might cost as much as 1 million USD in Europe.

 

 

 

Today’s example of why the Economic and Liberty scales are intertwined May 3, 2017

A few days ago the Washington Post published the article: As the poor join protests, Venezuela may be hitting a turning point.

The following passage highlights the fact that social and economic scales are inextricably intertwined:

The thousands of demonstrators pouring into the streets in recent weeks are mostly middle class, outraged by Venezuela’s economic collapse and the government’s increasingly authoritarian rule. But Venezuelans from longtime chavista strongholds are starting to join them, at considerable risk. Residents of Castillo’s neighborhood protested openly against Maduro for the first time last week.

Pro-government block captains in neighborhoods like El Guarataro have responded by threatening to deny food rations to those who march with the opposition or fail to join pro-Maduro rallies. Militia groups armed by the government and known as “colectivos” are deployed to intimidate would-be defectors and are suspected in the deaths of several protesters.

If people decide to turn out and protest the regime, it’s supporters will cut their food supply. Thus their social desires are held hostage to their economic needs.