Stossel: Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving! But before you eat that turkey, thank private property! Without it, Thanksgiving would be “Starvation Day.” Here’s why…

 

Did you know that the pilgrims almost starved after they arrived at Plymouth Rock? That’s because they were forced to farm “collectively.” The corporation that funded the expedition said, “grow food together. Divide the harvest equally.”

This is a terrible idea. It creates what economists call the “tragedy of the commons.” When you share property and the results of your work, people farm until the land is barren, don’t work as hard, or steal food from others.

John Stossel gathers young people from Students For Liberty and runs an experiment to demonstrate this “tragedy of the commons.” It shows the solution is private property, which is what saved the pilgrims.

H/T: ReasonTV
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Change Is The Wrong Metric To Determine Right And Left

Back during the inception of the Republican party it’s raison d’être was the radical idea of the abolition of slavery while the Democratic party favoured appeasement on the issue. The Republicans were the party of change while Democrats were of the status quo. The Video posted below details these facts.

In this case the change metric would have incorrectly had the Republicans on the Left and the Democrats on the Right.

This example aptly illustrates that the Right – Left determination has to be based on the proper metric of government size and power, not change. This is the underlying metric of the dictionary definitions of the various ideological terms with change being hardly mentioned.

It would seem that the primary purpose of the change metric is a desperate attempt at the incorrect placing certain ideologies that are clearly Leftist somewhere else. It should be obvious that governmental size and power is the only metric that makes sense given the ideological makeup of the various parties. It should also be manifestly obvious that the authoritarian extremes are on the Left. No amount of definitional prestidigitation, relativism or historical revisionism can change these facts.

Video: Pin the Tale on the Donkey: Democrats’ Horrible Racist Past | Bill Whittle

H/T PJ Media

 

PragerU: If You Hate Poverty, You Should Love The Free Market.

Globalization means the ever-increasing ability to move goods, people, and ideas from one distant location to another. Free trade is open access to markets and people from all over the world with few, if any, barriers. Property rights is ensuring that what belongs to you can’t be taken away on a whim by the state. The rule of law safeguards contracts, assuring that they will be respected and lived up to whether the deal is made in Peru or Poland. And entrepreneurship is the creativity of free people to dream up new products that we never knew we wanted or needed.

Did you know that since 1970, the percentage of humanity living in extreme poverty has fallen 80 percent? How did that happen? Arthur Brooks, president of the American Enterprise Institute, explains.

The next time you hear someone complain about capitalism, consider this: The percentage of people living at starvation level poverty has fallen 80% since 1970. Before then, more than one in four people around the world were living on a dollar a day or less. Today, it’s about one in twenty.

This is the greatest anti-poverty achievement in world history. So, how did this remarkable transformation come to pass? Was it the fabulous success of the United Nations? The generosity of U.S. foreign aid? The brilliant policies of the International Monetary Fund and World Bank? Stimulus spending? Government redistribution?

No. It was none of those things.

It was capitalism. Billions of souls around the world have been able to pull themselves out of poverty thanks to five incredible innovations: globalization, free trade, property rights, the rule of law, and entrepreneurship.

Globalization means the ever-increasing ability to move goods, people, and ideas from one distant location to another.

Free trade is open access to markets and people from all over the world with few, if any, barriers.

Property rights is ensuring that what belongs to you can’t be taken away on a whim by the state.

The rule of law safeguards contracts, assuring that they will be respected and lived up to whether the deal is made in Peru or Poland.

And entrepreneurship is the creativity of free people to dream up new products that we never knew we wanted or needed.

It’s worth noting that in places like East Asia, these five things were all made possible by the historic peace after World War II that resulted from America’s global diplomatic and military presence.

Let me put this in a slightly different way:

The ideals of free enterprise and global leadership, central to capitalism and American conservatism, are responsible for the greatest reduction in human misery since mankind began its long climb from the swamp to the stars. This remarkable progress has been America’s gift to the world.

So, if these American conservative ideals have done so much to lift up the world’s poor, you would think conservative ideas would be gaining strength every single day – everywhere. And not just gaining strength among conservatives, but also among young idealists, immigrants, minorities, and advocates for the poor—all embracing the principles of free enterprise and unleashing its power on behalf of the vulnerable.

But this hasn’t happened. To the contrary, capitalism is struggling to attract new followers. Indeed, some believe it’s destined to fade away – just as it has in much of Europe.

According to a Harvard Study, only 42% of young Americans 18 to 29 have a favorable view of capitalism. What explains this discrepancy between the incredible results of capitalism and its popularity? Why does capitalism get such bad rap?

One answer is simple: The defenders of free enterprise have done a terrible job of telling people how much good the system has done around the world. Capitalism has saved a couple billion people, and we have treated this miracle like a state secret.
According to a 2013 survey, 84 percent of Americans are unaware of the progress made against poverty worldwide. Indeed, more than two-thirds think global hunger has actually gotten worse.

Donate today to PragerU! http://l.prageru.com/2eB2p0h

 

Video: What Caused Venezuela’s Tragic Collapse? Socialism.

Venezuela has the world’s largest proven oil reserves, and it was once Latin America’s richest country. Today, most grocery store shelves are empty, and Venezuelans are so hungry that they’re killing zoo animals for sustenance. Toilet paper, diapers, and toothpaste are luxury goods. Venezuelan hospitals have disintegrated, children are dying because they can’t get antibiotics, and the infant mortality rate is higher than Syria. The capital city of Caracas is the murder capital of the world, and just 12 percent of citizens feel safe walking alone at night, which is the lowest figure reported in the world.

The government blames slumping oil prices for the desperate situation. The real cause is the socialist economy.

The real lesson of Venezuela’s tragic collapse is that real socialism always leads to economic breakdown and political repression. Those of us in wealthier, freer countries need to keep Venezuela in mind as we confront calls for more regulation and government control of all aspects of our own lives.

Produced by Todd Krainin. Written by Nick Gillespie. Camera by Jim Epstein.

H/T Reason TV

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